Bio

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Molly Erdman is an actor, improviser, and writer based in Los Angeles.

Raised in Dallas, Molly attended the Greenhill School and co-founded an improv group there during her senior year of high school.

From there she headed north to Boston (or pretty close to it) to attend Tufts University, where she majored in Drama and minored in Political Science. After graduating from college, Molly moved to Chicago to pursue acting and improv, ultimately hoping to make it to the famed Second City Mainstage.

She took classes and performed at iO (formerly Improv Olympic) where she was taught and directed by the late Del Close.

She also studied and performed at The Annoyance Theatre and The Second City, where she was hired to the National Touring Company in 2002 and the Mainstage in 2005.

On the Second City Mainstage, Molly wrote and performed three revues, including Between Barack and a Hard Place, which she had the honor of performing for then-Senator Barack Obama himself.

Her portrayal of Hillary Clinton in the show was featured in a segment on Nightline. In October 2007, Molly left the Second City and Chicago and headed to Los Angeles to further pursue film and television work.

She was featured in commercials for Sonic Drive-In from 2005 to 2009, and has also appeared on According to Jim, a pilot for MadTV’s Bobby Lee, Jimmy Kimmel Live, In the Flow With Affion Crockett, Arrested Development, The Millers, and in The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard. Molly also worked for Current TV, appearing as a reviewer on The Rotten Tomatoes Show, as well as freelance writing for both Rotten Tomatoes and Infomania.

In 2010, Molly started the blog Catalog Living, which takes a humorous look at the people who live inside home furnishing catalogs. The site has received over 4.3 million hits and has been featured in stories by The Chicago Tribune, NPR’s Marketplace, and The Associated Press. Catalog Living was named one of Time Magazine’s Top 25 Blogs of 2011 and her book, Catalog Living at its Most Absurd, was published by Plume in 2012.